Malunggay Moringa Oleifera

*Malunggay Moringa Oleifera: What www.lifeinhealth.org/moringa/ says

Moringa Oleifera contains more than 92 nutrients and 46 types of antioxidants. Moringa is said to cure about three hundred diseases and almost have all the vitamins found in fruits and vegetables. Even in a larger proportions. With all the health benefits of this miracle herb, it can easily be termed as the most nutritious herb on Earth. There are no side-effects which also has tried, tested, documented and proved evidence to support the same. It can be consumed by small children and adults. Today, millions world over have started using Moringa based products in porridge, pastas, bread and to reap the everlasting health benefits of the extraordinary ‘Moringa’ herb.

Some Facts about Moringa- (Excerpt From The Book “Miracle Tree” by Author Monica G.Marcu,Pharm.D., PH.D.)

  • 92 Nutrients
    • 46 Antioxidants
    • 36 Anti-Inflammatories
    • 18 Amino Acids, 9 Essential Amino Acids
    • Nourishes The Immune System
    • Promotes Healthy Circulation
    • Supports Normal Glucose Levels
    • Natural Anti-Aging Benefits
    • Provides Anti-Inflammatory Support
    • Promotes Healthy Digestion
    • Promotes Heightened Mental Clarity
    • Boosts Energy Without Caffeine
    • Encourages Balanced Metabolism
    • Promotes Softer Skin
    • Provides Relief From Acne
    • Supports Normal Hormone Levels

Rare for a plant source -Moringa leaves contain all the essential amino acids to build strong healthy bodies.

Malunggay Moringa Oleifera Planted in 2002, Tumaga, Zamboanga City.jpg
Moringa (Malungay) leaves compared to common foods
Values per 100gm. edible portion
Nutrient Moringa Leaves Other Foods
Vitamin A 6780 mcg Carrots: 1890 mcg
Vitamin C 220 mg Oranges: 30 mg
Calcium 440 mg Cow's milk: 120 mg
Potassium 259 mg Bananas: 88 mg
Protein 6.7 gm Cow's milk: 3.2 gm
Oleifera Oaxaca.jpg
Malunggay (Moringa oleifera) mature Tree with fruits.
Sonjna (Moringa oleifera) flowering branch at Kolkata W IMG 2118.jpg
Malunggay (Moringa oleifera) branch with Flowers.
Kalamunggay (Moringa oleifera).jpg
Malunggay (Moringa oleifera) mature Tree
Sonjna (Moringa oleifera) flowers at Kolkata W IMG 2123.jpg
Malunggay (Moringa oleifera) Flowers
Starr 080609-7915 Moringa oleifera.jpg
Malunggay (Moringa oleifera) Fruits
Fresh Kamalunggay (malunggay - moringa) fruits, as vegetable.jpg
Fresh Kamalunggay (malunggay - moringa) fruits, as vegetable
Malunggay Moringa Oleifera Planted in 2002, Tumaga, Zamboanga City.jpg
Malunggay Tree in Tumaga, Zamboanga

What other websites are saying about Malunggay Moringa Oleifera

From the Department of Science and Technology

Source: Reeva A. Calapatia

Abstract:

Malunggay (Moringa oleifera) plant is abundant throughout the Philippines. This plant grows anywhere in the country. It has become the buzz due to the discovery of its many nutrients. The researcher tends to study on medical value of Moringa oleifera in lowering blood glucose. This study was performed to determine the effectiveness of Moringa oleifera leaf extracts in lowering blood glucose. The experimental mice where weighed and their blood glucose were tested using a glucometer before the experiment. The mice were fed with condensed milk using the gavage method for five (5) consecutive days. All the mice gained high blood glucose after the procedure.

Different concentrations of malunggay leaf extracts: 25%, 50%, 75% and 0% were prepared. These extracts were treated to three (3) mice each as treated to the four groups of mice.

Data analysis revealed that there was a significant difference in the mean blood glucose level of white mice when subjected to various levels of malunggay leaves extract, the lower the blood glucose, The findings confirmed that the malunggay leaf extract has a hypoglycemic property that can be used as hypoglycemic drugs. Thus, it can be used in treating diabetes

Malunggay Moringa Oleifera: What wikipedia says

Moringa oleifera (synonym: Moringa pterygosperma) is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Moringa, which is the only genus in the family Moringaceae. English common names include moringa, and drumstick tree, from the appearance of the long, slender, triangular seed pods, horseradish tree, from the taste of the roots which resembles horseradish, or ben oil tree, from the oil derived from the seeds. The tree itself is rather slender, with drooping branches that grow to approximately 10m in height. In cultivation, it is often cut back annually to 1-2 meters and allowed to regrow so the pods and leaves remain within arm's reach.

In developing countries, moringa has potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development, and support sustainable landcare. It may be used as forage for livestock, a micronutrient liquid, a natural anthelmintic and possible adjuvant.

What The US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health says:

Evaluation of antidiabetic and antioxidant activity of Moringa oleifera in experimental diabetes.
Gupta R, Mathur M, Bajaj VK, Katariya P, Yadav S, Kamal R, Gupta RS.
Source
Reproductive Physiology Section, Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India. [email protected]
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Moringa oleifera, a widely cultivated species in India, is an exceptionally nutritious vegetable with a variety of potential uses in treating rheumatism, venomous bites, and microbial infections. In the present study, we investigated the antidiabetic and antioxidant effects of methanol extracts of M. oleifera pods (MOMtE) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic albino rats. METHODS:
Diabetic rats were treated with 150 or 300 mg/kg MOMtE for 21 days and the antidiabetic effects of the extract were evaluated by measuring changes in biochemical parameters in the serum and pancreatic tissue. Two phytoconstituents, namely quercetin and kaempferol, were isolated from the MOMtE extract and their structures were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. RESULTS:
The progression of diabetes was significantly reduced after MOMtE treatment. In treated rats, both doses of MOMtE induced a significant reduction in serum glucose and nitric oxide, with concomitant increases in serum insulin and protein levels. Furthermore, MOMtE treatment increased antioxidant levels in pancreatic tissue, with concomitant decreases in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Histologic examination of the pancreas from diabetic rats showed degenerative changes in β-cells; MOMtE treatment significantly reversed the histoarchitectural damage to the islets cells. CONCLUSION:
In conclusion, M. oleifera exerts protective effects against STZ-induced diabetes. The MOMtE exhibited significant antidiabetic and antioxidant activity and active constituents may be isolated from the extract for evaluation in future clinical studies.

© 2011 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

Malunggay Moringa Oleifera: What medicalhealthguide says

Malunggay (Moringa Oleifera) has been used as herbal medicine in many cultures for hundreds of years, Malunggay is known as a very nutritious plant where it is used to combat malnultrition in third world countries especially for infants and nursing mothers.

The malunggay pods are the most valued and widely used part of the plant. Malunggay pods contains essential amino acids, vitamins and other nutrients. Malunggay pods may be eaten raw or may be prepared or cooked. Malunggay pods may be fried and may produce a clear, odorless and sweet oil mostly called - Ben Oil.

Malunggay leaves may be eaten as greens, in salads and as vegetable ingredients for soups and other tropical viands. Malunggay flowers are cooked and eaten either mixed with other foods or fried in batter.

What the Philippines Department of Agriculture (Agricultural Training Institute) say about the Malunggay

Malunggay: The miracle vegetable
Mon, 10/26/2009 - 1:05pm by repost
By Nenita C. Planco, Agriculture magazine (10.2009)

Malunggay reportedly prevents 300 diseases, hence it is dubbed as "the miracle vegetable" and the "wonder tree."

Low in fats and carbohydrates, malunggay leaves are used to prevent anemia as these are rich in iron and vitamin B, and osteoporosis as these contain high amount of calcium.

The leaves also contain fiber, which is good against constipation, formation of gallstones and colon cancer. These have potassium, too that aids in managing blood pressure and is good for the nervous system.

Moreover, the leaves are rich in protein, which is good for bodybuilding and repair of tissues, plus vitamin A, which is good for the eyes, skin and heart.

Malunggay leaves also help strengthen the immune system due to its high vitamin C content. This helps the body fight scurvy and infectious diseases such as coughs, colds and flu.

According to studies, 3 tablespoons of powdered malunggay leaves contain 27 percent vitamin A and 22 percent vitamin C, which is equivalent to 7 oranges. It has 42 percent protein, 71 percent iron and 125 percent calcium equivalent to 4 glasses of milk. Its potassium content, meanwhile, is tantamount to 3 bananas. Malunggay leaves are slso three times more nutritious than spinach, and have four times more beta-carotene.

No doubt that malunggay is one of the world's highly nutritious vegetables. In fact, since the time immemorial up to this day, the leaves are used to treat fresh cuts and wounds.

Malunggay leaves were regarded as the poor man's vegetable, and this was especially true in the Visayas where malunggay trees were common in sight, hence leaves can be had by just asking.

The leaves are so easy to prepare. Since these are free from bacteria which are commonly found in vegetables growing close to the ground, leaves are dropped into a pot of boiling water even without washing.

Malunggay tree is also regarded as the lazy man's plant for it doesn't have to be cultivated and fertilized regularly. It thrives well in sandy loam soil provided it is exposed to sunlight. It bears leaves and flowers whole year round.

However, when its branches are already tall, these have to be pruned for new leaves to sprout. But if pods are needed, then the branches are left to bear fruits and pods. Pruning can be done after the pods are harvested.

It is best to plant malunggay tree during the rainy season. One can either sow its seeds or plant branches. But many prefer to plant the branch as it grows fast. It just takes three to four months.

Edible Parts of the Malunggay / Moringa Eleifera Tree

  1. The Leaves - As soup, in salad, as juice, as green tea.
    • To use the leaves as soup, simply pick the fresh malunggay leaves, wash them, remove the leaves from the stem and add them to boiling water.
  2. The Flowers - As salad, as soup.
  3. The Fruits - As a snack, mixed in salad, mixed in stir-fry

Medical Uses Of Malunggay - Health Benefits

Malunggay, combat malnutrition, used to combat malnutrition, especially among infants and nursing mothers vitamins A, B and C, calcium, iron and protein. For post-natal care, the young leaves are eaten to stimulate lactation.

Malunggay - Antiinfectious: Antibacterial; Anti Fungal, . In late 1940's, The Department of Biochemistry at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore (PLN Rao) have found that malunggay or Moringa Oleifera leaves contain a compound "pterygospermin" that is known in medical science as having antimicrobial, antibacterial, anti fungal properties.

Malunggay - Anti Cancer Malunggay or Moringa has been shown in studies to have an anti-tumor capacity. Moringa contains benzyl isothiocyanate. There are many studies that have shown this chemical and compounds derived thereof to have anti-cancer and chemoprotective capabilities. This chemoprotective aspect is critical for those who are battling cancer; this helps strengthen cells so that they can tolerate chemotherapy. Malunggay is also considered int he treatment of prostate cancer and skin cancer. (Ref: Fuglie LJ (2000) New Uses of Moringa Studied in Nicaragua. ECHO Development Notes #68, June, 2000. www.echotech.org/network/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=194)

Malunggay - anti-inflamatory: Malunggay has been found to inhibit inflammation in a controlled scientific study conducted by Philippine DOST Scientists (Amelia P. Guevara, Carolyn Vargas and Milagros Uy). When an aquous seed extract of malunggay has been administered to a carrageenan induced inflammation, its was noted that the aquous seed extract of the Malunggay (Moringa Oleifera) inhibited the development of edema in ratpaw. The Malunggay is traditionally used to prevent and treat inflammations associated with rheumatism, arthritis and joint pains.

Malunggay - Reproductive health. Fuglie LJ (1999) The Miracle Tree: Moringa oleifera: Natural Nutrition for the Tropics has reported that Malunggay or Moringa Oleifera is widely beleived to have an aphrodisiac action that enhances the sexual activity. Malunggay or moringa oleifera young leaves is also widely used to increase the flow of milk for lactating mothers.

How Manlungay compares to some common foods

Moringa leaf.gif
Malunggay the Super Herb

Moringa (Malungay) leaves compared to common foods
Values per 100gm. edible portion
Nutrient Moringa Leaves Other Foods
Vitamin A 6780 mcg Carrots: 1890 mcg
Vitamin C 220 mg Oranges: 30 mg
Calcium 440 mg Cow's milk: 120 mg
Potassium 259 mg Bananas: 88 mg
Protein 6.7 gm Cow's milk: 3.2 gm

Malunggay (Moringa Oleifera) Herbal Medicine Preparation

  • Malunggay as food. Malunggay pods may be eaten raw or may also be fried with peanut similar taste. Malunggay leaves and flower may also be cooked together with other vegetables and meat to form soups or viands.
  • Malunggay decoction for washing sores and wounds, Boil malunggay roots and let it cool to tolerable warm temperature and use it to wash wounds and sores. By gargling the Malunggay decoctionm, it may also be used to wash mouth sores and sore throats.
  • Malunggay poultice. Grounded Malunggay seeds, leaves and bark may be applied topically as poultice onto swollen flesh to relieve inflammation.
  • Malunggay oil may be taken internally as mixed with foods, it is known to be a powerful antioxidant even used by the early people from Egypt. Malunggay oil also known as Ben oil is widely used as oil base for perfumes and cosmetics. The oil is extracted from Malunggay seeds by pressing.

Malunggay Herbal Medicine Precautions, Side Effects

Although malunggay consumption is generally accepted as safe. But according to Indian traditional usage, Malunggay may have an abortificient effects. (Ref: Nath D, N Sethi, et al. (1997) Survey on indigenous medicinal plants used for abortion in some districts of Uttar Pradesh. Fitoterapia 68(3): 223-225)

How to plant or Grow the Malunngay - Moringa Oleifera

  • By Franklin H. Maletsky
Planting using cut malunggay branches:
  1. Cut a mature, healthy branch to about 2 feet to 3 feet long.
  2. Dig a hole in the ground to a depth of about 1/2 foot then plant the branch into the hole and cover it with soil.
  3. Maintain a planting distance of 3 feet to 4 feet.
  4. If you want to use the malunggay - moringa as a fence post. Cut it about 5 feet long. Put it in a hole about 1 foot deep. Keep them as close together or as far apart as you want.
Planting using seeds:
  1. Pick the dried mature seeds from the pod.
  2. Directly plant the seed into the ground about 1/2 inch deep only.
  3. If it is not the rainy season, keep the soil moist.
Planting from Seedlings
  1. Spread the seeds in a soil bed.
  2. Cover the seeds with about 1/2 inch of soil.
  3. Keep the soil moist.
  4. After the seeds sprout and the seedlings are about 6 inches tall, transplant them anywhere you want.

Plant Malunggay Trees to help Reforestation

Oleifera Oaxaca.jpg

Malunngay can be grown anywhere in the Philippines. Serves as one of the best vegetable and food supplement ever.

Line the highways with Malunggay. Let the people enjoy the harvest to provide the filipinos with better nutrition. The www.medicalhealthguide.com/articles/malunggay.htm says:

  • Malunggay (Moringa Oleifera) has been used as herbal medicine in many cultures for hundreds of years, Malunggay is known as a very nutritious plant where it is used to combat malnultrition in third world countries especially for infants and nursing mothers.
  • The malunggay pods are the most valued and widely used part of the plant. Malunggay pods contains essential amino acids, vitamins and other nutrients. Malunggay pods may be eaten raw or may be prepared or cooked. Malunggay pods may be fried and may produce a clear, odorless and sweet oil mostly called - Ben Oil.
  • Malunggay leaves may be eaten as greens, in salads and as vegetable ingredients for soups and other tropical viands. *Malunggay flowers are cooked and eaten either mixed with other foods or fried in batter.

Watch this video about a Malunggay Tree Farm:

  • If the video does not show just "reload the page","refresh", or just hit "F5".

During the rainy season plant as many malunggay trees in the hilly areas of the watershed. This is a great way to prevent erosion. You can cut a malunggay tree down to only one inch from the ground and the tree will grow back with a vengeance. It does not die therefore the roots of the tree continue to hold the hill together preventing erosion.

Malunggay is easy to plant. You can plant it by simply spreading the seeds as I have suggested to the DENR regarding other types of trees. You can plant malunggay by planting saplings or you can simply stick a malunggay branch in the ground.

You can cut a malunggay branch into several foot long pieces. Stick the pieces in the ground about five inches deep and just leave it for nature to take over. It does not need any special care. If you plant these malunggay sticks during the rainy season, they will grow fast. Within 4 to 5 months you will have malunggay trees at least 4 feet tall.

I used to use malunggay as fence posts. I learned this as a young boy when I saw my mother sticking these malunggay branches to support the fence. She said "this will support the fence and it will keep the hungry neighbors from jumping the fence to harvest malunggay. They can simply harvest from the fence line and they won't bother what is inside."

Where does Malunggay / Moringa Oleifera grow

Malunggay / Moringa Oleifera will grow in any type of soil. Sandy loam is preferred but even in clayish soil it will grow. Malunggay can survive through droughts. It will even survive mild freezing winters.

It will grow real well anywhere near the growing zone of the equator (zone 12 to 13). But Malunggay/Moringa Oleifera will also grow and survive within zones 5 through 11. In areas where the temperature drops below freezing as in some parts of California and Texas, Malunggay/Moringa will still survive. The tops will freeze but the deep roots will survive. So as soon as the weather warms up in spring, the malunggay/moringa will shoot out some saplings. Within a couple of months you can start harvesting the leaves for vegetables.

In areas where the soil freezes, you can cut the Malunggay/Moringa tree down to about an 8" (eight inches) stump). Insulate it with leaves or grass (pile it wide and high) so the soil of about 3 feet radius of the trunk won't freeze. The snow on top of the pile will help insulate your malunggay. When the snow melts and the temperature is over 40*F remove the insulation and let the Malunggay/Moringa "breath", soon enough you will see saplings and you can start harvesting again within 2 months.

Malunggay for a healthy lifestyle

Malunggay can be cooked and eaten with rice, but MPFI board secretary Elena Van Tooren suggests drying the leaves, blending it until it is pulverized, and adding it to food or juice.

Malunggay leaves can be dried by bundling the harvested branches up and hanging them upside down to dry in the sun. Make sure that a mat would catch the dry leaves that would fall off. 10 kilograms of fresh malunggay shrinks to one kilogram when dried, Barrozo said, making dried malunggay richer and more concentrated. It loses its Vitamins A and C content when dried, but it does retain the rest of its nutrients.

Van Tooren recommends taking one tablespoon a day for people who want to stay healthy, and two tablespoons for those suffering from health issues such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

For pregnant women, she recommends taking three tablespoons a day. Malunggay is also sold as powder, tea, and capsules.

How to make Malungay Moringa Tea

  • Collect fresh green malungay leaves.
  • Hang to dry. Do not put under the sun. Just let the leaves air dry.
  • Crush the leaves.
  • Put the crushed leaves in a bottle or bag them. You can buy empty tea bags for packing.
  • Drink malungay tea just like any other teas.

Malunggay Moringa Oleifera: CONSTRUCTION OF MALUNGGAY POWDER PROCESSING LABORATORY AT JGE Tagkawayan Campus

  • www.slsu.edu.ph/main/citizen-s-charter/37-bids-and-awards/166-construction-of-malunggay-powder-processing-laboratory-at-jge-tagkawayan-campus.html

Published on Wednesday, 19 December 2012 00:58

Republic of the Philippines

SOUTHERN LUZON STATE UNIVERSITY Lucban, Quezon INVITATION TO APPLY FOR ELIGIBILITY AND TO BID

The Southern Luzon State University, through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites prospective bidders to apply for eligibility and to bid for the hereunder project:

Name of Project CONSTRUCTION OF MALUNGGAY POWDER PROCESSING LABORATORY AT JGE Tagkawayan Campus

Location Southern Luzon State University, Tagkawayan, Quezon

Approved budget for the contract ONE MILLION NINE HUNDRED THIRTY FOUR THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED FIFTY FIVE PESOS AND 01/100 ONLY (Php 1,934,655.01)

The Eligibility Check/Screening as well as the Preliminary Examination of Bids shall use non-discretionary “pass/fail” criteria. Post-qualification of the lowest calculated bid shall be conducted.

All particulars relative to Eligibility Statement and Screening, Bid Security, Evaluation of Bids, Post-Qualification and Award of Contract shall be governed by the pertinent provisions of R.A. 9184 and its Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR). Bid Documents will be available only to prospective bidders upon payment of a non-refundable amount of Two Thousand Pesos (PhP 2,000.00) to the Southern Luzon State University Cashier.

The SLSU BAC assumes no responsibility whatsoever to compensate or indemnify bidders for any expenses incurred in the preparation of the bid.

The Southern Luzon State University reserves the right to accept or reject any Bid, to annul the bidding process, and to reject all Bids at any time prior to contract award, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected Bidder or Bidders.

The Secretariat
SLSU Bids and Awards Committee
Planning Office
Lucban, Quezon
Tel. No. (042) 540-7650

Malunggay - Moringa Photo Gallery

News About Malunggay - Moringa Oleifera

Meet the Mighty, Mighty Moringa Tree

By Natalie Beach

At first glance, gangly Moringa oleifera, with its thin stems and long seedpods, doesn’t look all that impressive. But looks can be deceiving: Ounce for ounce, the leaves contain three times the iron of spinach, four times the calcium of milk, and more protein than sardines.

Farmed in its native India for centuries, M. oleifera is just now catching on in the United States. “It’s easy to grow and loves the heat,” says Fred Dixon of The Orchid, in Goleta, California, one of a handful of American farms cultivating the tree. Dixon started last year with 800 seeds and now has more than a thousand 13-footers. While the leaves can be prepared like spinach, Dixon also dries and crushes them into a powder that’s gaining popularity among smoothie-lovers.

Moringa’s myriad applications go far beyond health shakes, however. Its roots have anti-inflammatory benefits; the seed cake (what’s left after oil extraction) can purify drinking water, fight bacteria, and act as fertilizer. In addition, growing M. oleifera combats erosion. Since 2010, Zambia’s Imagine Rural Development Initiative has used the plant to lift families out of poverty, helping locals start and manage their own moringa plantations. Today, 60 Zambian farmers tend some six million trees, feeding malnourished communities and boosting regional economies. Superfood, indeed.


Why Moringa is Known as ‘The Miracle Tree’

By Diane MacEachern

A small serving of moringa’s tiny leaves has seven times the amount of vitamin C in an orange, four times the calcium of milk, and four times the beta-carotene of carrots. Pow! Talk about a nutritional punch. It also has all the “super” qualities of a typical superfood:

• It’s high in protein but low in fat.

• It’s gluten-free.

• It’s chock full of omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, folate and fiber.

• Many parts of the plant can be consumed, not just what might be considered the fruit or the vegetable.

• It grows fast and can tolerate dry heat and other harsh conditions, requiring little in the way of fertilizer or water, so it can be grown in places suffering from drought.

Moringa is actually a tree (Moringa oleifera) that’s native to northern India but now being grown as far away as Senegal and the Philippines. You can eat almost every part of it. The pods taste like string beans, but only sweeter. The leaves can be used in place of spinach. The seeds, when dried, crunch like peanuts. Dry and grate the roots and voila—a substitute for horseradish.

It’s a boon to the planet, too.

• It’s one of the fastest growing plants in the world, reaching between 9 and 15 feet the first year after the seed is planted in the ground.

• Amazingly, the seeds can purify water. This research in Uganda showed that “moringa seeds powder can remove 80-90 percent of dirtiness in water,” an important discovery for a country where 40 percent of the population does not have access to clean water.

• Beyond the food it produces and its water purification properties, the moringa can be turned into wood, paper and liquid fuel. Oil extracted from its seeds won’t spoil or turn rancid, so it can be used in cooking, cosmetics, as a preservative and as a machinery lubricant.

• Plus, it is becoming a source of people’s livelihoods in Africa, where farmers, particularly women, are receiving microloans to plant, harvest and sell moringa trees.

Reportedly, moringa leaves have many medicinal benefits as well.

• Juice from the leaves is used to treat anxiety and may be able to help control glucose levels for people suffering from diabetes.

• It may be able to remedy diarrhea, dysentery and colitis.

• Some people who suffer from headache rub the leaves and buds on their temples to soothe the pain.

• The juice of the leaves is used as a skin antiseptic.

No wonder the moringa tree is often called “the miracle tree” or “the tree of life!”

If you want to give it a try, search for it online or at vitamin stores and natural foods markets. It’s available in tea bags, a powder you can add to a recipe, a capsule you can take like a vitamin, skin and hair oil and body butter. As with any product, read the label before you buy to make sure you’re getting real moringa and not a synthetic version.


High school research seeks to fight cancer, reaps int’l recognition

By Carmel Loise Matus

High school student Arianwen Ledesma-Rollan saw how her grandmother waged, and lost, a costly and painful battle against pancreatic cancer.

The pain of losing a loved one fueled her search for an inexpensive cure for cancer.

She started looking at her own backyard and focused on Moringa oleifera (malunggay) seeds, which have been reported to contain natural agents that could fight cancer.

Her research, which she also conducted as an investigatory project to fulfill a requirement for her Life Science subject in school, was cited during the 2016 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair at Phoenix, Arizona, United States of America from May 8 to 13.

Rollan, 17, was the only Filipino among the 10 awardees who received the Special Award from the Qatar Foundation for Research and Development during the fair.

“Wala ko mag-expect nga makadaog kay (I did not expect to win because) I was in the infraction list and I was afraid that I would never get to display my project,” she recalled.

“Being in the infraction list means that the Scientific Review Committee had concerns about my project,” she added.

Being one of the special awardees is not a small feat for this incoming Grade 11 student at the Cebu City National Science High School.

The 2016 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair is a program of Society for Science and the Public that invites high school students around the globe to share their original ideas, showcase cutting-edge research and compete for more than $4 million in awards and scholarships.

At least 1,700 young innovators from 419 affiliate fairs in 77 countries, regions and territories participated in the science showcase.

Rollan, who plans to become an obstetrician, said she was inspired by her grandmother, Amada Ledesma, 75, who died of pancreatic cancer five years ago.

She said her grandmother suffered for 10 months. Her medicines and treatment were very expensive.

“I saw that Moringa (malunggay) is very common in Cebu. There are claims that the plant can help fight certain illnesses but it doesn’t have any study to back it. That’s why I chose to do this project,” she said.

Rollan said she took an extract from the crushed malunggay seeds and injected it in a chick embryo. Then she observed it for 36 hours.

She said she noticed that the tumor did not spread after the malunggay seed extract stopped the development of the blood vessel.

She explained that tumors are often developed due to angiogenesis or the development of new blood vessels in pre-existing vessels.

Based on her research, malunggay seeds have potential anti-tumor agent.

Her project won first prize in their school fair, besting 50 other investigatory projects in their school.

After she won at the science fair at both division and regional levels, she competed in the National Science and Technology Fair sponsored by the Department of Education (DepEd) in Tagaytay City.

Her victory at the national level gave her the golden ticket to be a part of the Philippine delegation to compete in the 2016 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Phoenix.

She ended as the only Filipino to receive a special award which went with a certificate and a cash prize of $1,000.

Rollan said she planned to use her prize money to continue her research because it was still in the preliminary stages.

But she was hoping that her achievement would inspire other young innovators not to stop what they were doing despite the lack of government support.

“We were the only ones who were not sponsored by their own government but still we were selected,” she said.

“I just hope the Philippine government would further this research so that it can help those who are in need of medicines to help fight tumor,” she said.


Why We Should Learn More About Moringa

By Darryle Pollack

As a 20-year cancer survivor, I thought that I had heard of everything possible to promote good health. Then again, I also believe that the more you know, the more there is to learn. And moringa is proof of that.

Though I initially thought it might be a new Latin dance, I learned that moringa oleifera actually is a plant found in locales from the Caribbean to Asia to Africa, where it’s been used in folk remedies for centuries. Almost unknown in the United States, its popularity is growing worldwide thanks to what many believe are its health benefits—-ranging from boosting immunity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, controlling blood pressure, blood sugar, increasing breast milk, even headache relief.

Moringa is so versatile that the entire plant can be used from root to seeds to tiny leaves; people fry, crush, boil, grind, blanch, even chew its various parts. Less creative or daring types who want its benefits can just take moringa as a supplement in its powder form.

I learned about Moringa thanks to Grace O., author of The Aging Gracefully Cookbook, featuring her collection of recipes to promote health, wellness and longevity. Moringa and 25 other intriguing ingredients form the foundation for her program called FoodTrients . As you might deduce, Foodtrients is a marriage of healthy nutrients and food, a philosophy inspired by the marriage of her parents. Grace’s father was a medical doctor who believed foods could help his patients heal; her mother ran a cooking school in Southeast Asia where Grace was raised, and where people have been been eating indigenous plants known for health properties for thousands of years.

In addition to operating skilled nursing facilities in California, Grace O’s mission is to share her knowledge and experience. Here’s how she describes Foodtrients:

The nutrients in our food lead to our overall wellness...I start creating a recipe only after I find a fruit or grain or spice that has something beneficial to offer my body...To create my recipes, I scoured scientific studies, dug into long-established knowledge of medicinal herbs, sought out natural ingredients from cultures all over the world and drew on memories of my mother’s culinary wisdom.

At her recent cookbook launch in Beverly Hills, featuring a Foodtrient buffet, moringa showed up as a dip paired with artichokes. I wasn’t the only one at the event mystified by unfamiliar ingredients. Celebrity chef and Los Angeles restauranteur Eric Greenspan commented:

There were a lot of ingredients I didn’t recognize.... Grace works them into everyday dishes, things like moringa, a plant with super nutritious leaves that she adds to vegetable soup. ..I was impressed by how well the flavors work together. What I love about Grace’s book is that her recipes are very accessible and easy for the average home cook to execute. I’m already thinking about how to work moringa into my grilled cheese sandwiches!

In addition to chefs, scientists are also interested in learning more about moringa. It’s the focus of current scientific studies seeking to prove its effectiveness as used in folk remedies. With a boost from Grace O’s culinary creativity, moringa could soon become a household word. Remember you heard it here first.


Meet the New Kale of 2016: Moringa

By Lizzie Fuhr (Additional reporting by Michele Foley)

Moringa has been revered among Ayurvedic circles for hundreds of years, but it's currently poised to become the hot superfood of 2016. Nearly every part of the moringa oleifera, or drumstick tree, is edible and packed with vitamin C, protein, iron, and calcium. If you can't get your hands on the fresh greens yet — not to worry — you can readily take a supplement or toss a powdered version into a smoothie to reap its benefits. Here's why it's worth a try:

It's a nutritional powerhouse: Moringa has been named a superfood for good reason. It has three times the potassium of a banana, three times the calcium of milk, and two times the protein of yoghurt — three grams per tablespoon! Any vegan eaters who have a tough time getting enough protein can benefit from the introduction of moringa into their diet.

It supports breastfeeding: In one study, researchers found mothers of premature babies increase their volume of breast milk after ingesting moringa capsules. While the study was small, the results are promising.

It may be used to fight cancer: In addition to being potent in antioxidants, one study found that both the leaf and bark of the moringa plant have antimalignant properties that could be beneficial when developing new cancer drugs.


The many unknown benefits of moringa leaf

By Chioma Obinna

Moringa is called the Miracle Tree for good reason. Moringa oleifera tree has been called the tree of life in many cultures around the world, including Nigeria. It has many names based on its many uses: clarifier tree, horseradish tree and drumstick tree (referring to the large drumstick shaped pods) and in East Africa moringa is known as “mother’s best friend”.

Here in the Nigeria, its names include Ewe Igbale in Yoruba, Zogelle in Hasusa and Idagbo monoye in Igbo.

It is estimated that at least 300 diseases can be cured by taking this supplement along with hundreds of other health benefits, thanks to its more than 90 nutrients, 46 different antioxidants, and all eight essential amino acids. Here is a more in-depth look at the health benefits of Moringa leaves and seeds.

Scientific studies have shown that it contains specific antioxidants and health promoting ingredients that offer palliatives to malnutrition, hunger and diseases.

Moringa is rich in many vitamins, including Vitamin A, several forms of Vitamin B, Vitamin C, Vitamin D and Vitamin E. In fact, it has more of these vitamins than a variety of foods that all claim to be excellent sources of them, such as carrots, oranges and milk. These vitamins provide a number of recognized health benefits. Moringa leaves have a few specific benefits that must be touched on as well. Protein is a vital nutrient found in the leaves of this tree.

There is twice as much calcium in Moringa leaves than in milk. Iron is found in large quantities in Moringa leaves as well. In fact, there is three times as much iron in this plant than in spinach. Along with these specific nutrients, the leaves can be consumed to stimulate your metabolism, thus aiding in weight loss. This is possible because Moringa provides energy without sugar. The leaves can also be used to beautify your skin, thus they are commonly taken as supplement by women looking for healthier skin.Moringa seeds have a number of benefits specific to them as well.

They contain iron, just like the leaves, and they also contain amino acids along with anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties. That means if you have minor injuries like bruises, cuts or burns, you will heal faster when you take Moringa supplements.

Along with these specific health benefits, you can even put its seeds in dirty water and they will attract the impurities and make the water drinkable. As far as science is concerned, Moringa is an all time find.


‘Malunggay’ pushed for survivors of ‘Yolanda’

By Tonette Orejas (Inquirer Central Luzon, Philippine Daily Inquirer)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO—Eat their leaves raw for hydration. Mix them with other meals for better nutrition. Inexpensive and readily available even in the worst of times.

“Malunggay” (Moringa oleifera), according to a group promoting its consumption for better health, offers answers to the nutrition needs of the victims of Supertyphoon “Yolanda” in the Visayas.

“It’s going to be a big help to the victims of the disaster,” said Bernadette Estrella-Arellano, founder of Moringaling Philippines Foundation Inc. (MPFI), which promotes the consumption of malunggay.

She said people could eat malunggay leaves raw to hydrate their bodies. These could also be mixed with any meal to improve nutrition.

“It was the answer to malnutrition in poor countries,” she said.

Arellano said the fifth congress of MPFI would set aside time to discuss how the network of malunggay advocates could help in the nutrition programs of the national government.

Some 500 consumers, producers, educators and community organizers are expected to attend the congress set at Clark Freeport Zone on Nov. 21-22.

Arellano said reports she received showed that the typhoon spared a farm planted with a million malunggay trees in Negros Occidental province.

The typhoon, described to be the strongest in the world this year, ravaged provinces in the Visayas.

Arellano said staving off widespread hunger in these disaster-torn areas and keeping people’s nutrition level up were seen to be among the major challenges of the government in the rebuilding process.

In Negros Occidental, a foundation combines mongo, rice and malunggay in a small pack and sells each for only P4. This can be eaten by adding a little amount of water to it, Arellano said.

Survivors, whether in government-built shelters or in their villages, can plant more malunggay through stem cuttings, she said.

MPFI, started in 2009, has lobbied for a law declaring moringa as a national vegetable and November as Moringa Month.

Arellano said several MPFI members export about 3 tons of moringa powder every year.


Moringa oleifera – said to be a wondrous plant

(New Era Staff Reporter)

This superfood is rich in vitamin C and protein and is loaded with free-radical-fighting antioxidants. Add moringa powder to smoothies or oatmeal and reap the amazing health benefits

Elizabeth Hilger might have missed the grand prize at this year’s 9th Bank Windhoek Women Summit last week but for this focused, down-to-earth businesswoman coming to Windhoek was not about winning but her aim was something different.

As the owner of one of the finest lodges in Kavango East, Hilger already has cupboards filled with awards bestowed on her by the Hospitality Association of Namibia (HAN). She’s also won various international accolades as her business, Tambuti Lodge, on the banks of the Kavango River, was on numerous occasions chosen as the best in client service, and as one of the places where local and foreign tourists find tranquillity during their stay.

Hilger was not an unknown person when she entered the room of the summit, whose slogan read, “Women Embracing Change for Prosperity.” In line with the theme Hilger tours the regions when time allows to inspire other women not to let their head down but always to look at the brighter side of life.

During breaks at the summit from behind her exhibition desk she talked to and enlightened other women about a specific tree that “gave life” to about 110 orphans and poor children. She is also the founder of the Theresia’s Orphans and Vulnerable Children Foundation located about 20 kilometres outside Rundu at a small village called Mavanze.

She has been running this orphanage from her own pocket and with some donations from a few donors. She also uses part of the income she generated from Moringa oleifera powder to care for the children who are less privileged.

The Moringa oleifera is classified as a super food. The tree grows naturally in some parts of Namibia and parts of the plant are said to be safe for human consumption.

However a check of a medical site on the internet issues a warning: “Moringa is possibly safe when taken by mouth and used appropriately. The leaves, fruit, and seeds might be safe when eaten as food. However, it’s important to avoid eating the root and its extracts. These parts of the plant may contain a toxic substance that can cause paralysis and death. Moringa has been used safely in doses up to 6 grams daily for up to 3 weeks.

There isn’t enough information to know if moringa is safe when used in medicinal amounts.”

Another internet site says do not try Moringa oleifera until you know all the facts.

But according to her the plant is an energizing product that is said to help with healing and is said to be used to treat skin disorders, allegedly also diabetes, sleep disorders, anxiety and depression. It supposedly gives one a huge boost in energy and it is said to even out blood sugar levels, and allegedly helps one recover more quickly after a workout.The children benefit from the orchard where they look after 482 trees that produce “a highly nutritious powder”.

“At the foundation we cut and clean the leaves than let them dry before we pound some into powder and sell the rest to our customers who use it,” she said.

She said Mavanze village is surrounded with Moringa whose pods they utilise for various medicinal uses but an important use is to purify dirty water for drinking and washing as it contains all the chemical compounds necessary.

Villagers harvest the leaves, seeds and pods and sell them to the foundation to be utilised for animal fodder or for own use.

Hilger said that students from the Polytechnic of Namibia are currently doing research on the water purification effects of the pods.

She claims the children under her care are more healthier than any other kid at school or at any home as they daily take Moringa oleifera in their daily meals.

Hilger sat behind her table where she displayed the Moringa oleifeira leaves and containers filled with the powder and the pods.

Also on the table were two bottles – one filled with dirty water and the other with clear water. In front stood many curious summit goers as the excitement grew among them to obtain all the information about the plant’s supposedly amazing health benefits.

As she spoke about the product on the first day of the summit women took out their money to buy her consignment from the exhibition table within half an hour.

At last she had time for the reporter and was free to talk without any interruptions. “Have you recently been hearing about the mystical miracle tree, or the tree of life?” she asked.

These are terms that have been offered to describe Moringa oleifera. It has a number of amazing health benefits, according to thousands of scientists from around the world, she claimed.

“Would you believe me if I told you that it has been around for hundreds of years, helping people to hold onto their good health, to recover from medical problems, and to jump start their energy levels?” Hilger excitedly asked. “No!” I replied.

“Moringa is a tree and various parts of the plants are edible,” she said. She said some people use the pods in cooking, while others eat the leaves.

“You can additionally press oil from the seeds, or eat the roots. The plant also has flowers, which are comparable to mushrooms.” But internet sites warned that the roots should not be eaten.

Traditional medicine uses the roots, leaves and seeds in their medicinal recipes.

“The leaves can be cooked like spinach, or they can be dried and used in soups or other recipes. The pods can be eaten like nuts, and the roots can be diced up and used as a sauce similar to our use for relish. Even better it grows naturally all around the world, it is safe to consume, and is a medically proven health supplement.”

The tree grows even in dry and sandy areas because the climate in Kavango is perfect for cultivating the product. It grows quickly and does not easily wilt because of the lack of water or poor soil.

Moringa oleifera is said to have four times as much calcium as you get from milk, three times the amount of potassium you get from bananas.

Traditionally these are the foods where you think you get the most bang for your bucks, but instead, this supplement crushed the numbers in every category, according to Hilger.

The leaves are said to have 22 percent the daily value of Vitamin C, 41 percent the daily value of potassium, 61 percent the daily value of magnesium, 71 percent the daily value of iron, 125 percent the daily value of calcium and 272 percent the daily value of Vitamin A. It also has 92 nutrients, 46 antioxidants, 36 anti-inflammatory agents, 18 amino acids and nine essential amino acids, according to some literature.

Hilger said there is no value addition to her products as she is still awaiting a response from international investors on the proposals she presented to them to process the plant as a super food and a complete health product that will not only provide people with the vitamins they need, but also improve their overall health as well.


Moringa could be ‘Tree of Life’ for developing countries

(NewsNetNebraska)

A prolific plant that grows in Nicaraga may be the answer to helping the poor country and others like it develop.

Moringa Oleifera grows to be a 20-foot tree if it is not pruned. In Nicaragua, it grows in plantations, along the streets and in backyards. The leaves are protein-packed and offer vitamins C, A and E, calcium, potassium, iron and all necessary amino acids.

When mashed into a cake, the seeds can purify water. Nicaragua’s water is poorly sanitized and waterborne illnesses are vast.

Every part of the plant is beneficial — even the stems, which are used to feed livestock.

People who are aware of moringa’s nutrition benefits use the leaves in their tea; moringa powder can be mixed into any kind of food.

But aside from the health benefits, moringa production can provide an economic boost. Workers are needed in moringa plantations and the factories that produce moringa oil and capsules.

Most people, however, are uneducated about moringa’s benefits. The diet of Nicaraguans consists of heavily fried fatty foods and soda pop.

Despite that, Marvin Ramirez, an agriculturist and moringa expert, is optimistic about the plant.

“This plant could be the answer for Third World countries to help them to develop,” he said. “God created everything perfect, and in the Good Book was talked about ‘The Tree of Life.’ Perhaps this could be it.”


The healing powers of moringa

By Chris Kilham

In a remote valley of Congo, on a farm with splendid views of lush green mountains, I stand amidst a plantation of young moringa trees. The green leaves glisten in the African sun, the seed pods hang in curls. I pull a tender young leaf and chew on it, enjoying the fresh, pleasing taste. The Belgian couple growing this crop plans to cash in on an up-and-coming trend and their timing appears to be just right.

Over the past few years, a botanical new to the U.S. and European markets has been making impressive gains in popularity, due to its broad traditional benefits and emerging supportive science. That plant, moringa oleifera, is native to northern India, Pakistan, the Himalayan region, Africa and Arabia, but is now cultivated more widely throughout the tropics. The young plantation I have visited in Congo is one such cultivation project.

Also known as drumstick tree or horseradish tree, moringa trees grow quickly, reaching a height of between 15 and 30 feet within just a few years. The leaves, fruit flowers and immature pods of the tree are eaten as nutritious foods. The leaves in particular are consumed either raw in salads, tossed into blender drinks, or steamed like spinach. Rich in protein, beta-carotene, vitamin C, potassium and calcium, the leaves make an excellent green vegetable, and are pleasing in flavor.

But beyond the flavor and nutrition, moringa offers healing benefits. Virtually all parts of the plant are used to treat inflammation, infectious disorders, and various problems of the cardiovascular and digestive organs, while improving liver function and enhancing milk flow in nursing mothers. The uses of moringa are well documented in both the Ayurvedic and Unani systems of traditional medicine, among the most ancient healing systems in the world.

Moringa is rich in a variety of health-enhancing compounds, including moringine, moringinine, the potent antioxidants quercetin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, and various polyphenols. The leaves seem to be getting the most market attention, notably for their use in reducing high blood pressure, eliminating water weight, and lowering cholesterol.

Studies show that moringa leaves possess anti-tumor and anti-cancer activities, due in part to a compound called niaziminin. Preliminary experimentation also shows activity against the Epstein-Barr virus. Compounds in the leaf appear to help regulate thyroid function, especially in cases of over-active thyroid. Further research points to anti-viral activity in cases of Herpes simplex 1.

Now that moringa is emerging as a popular supplement for health enhancement, the science on this plant is accelerating. The glucose-modifying, anti-diabetic effects of moringa may prove of great use amidst a virtual epidemic of Type 2 diabetes and obesity. The liver-protective activities of the leaf and its extracts could make it a staple component of bitters formulas and various cleansing preparations. And ongoing work on the anti-cancer properties of moringa may at some point earn this plant a role in chemotherapy.

In the traditional medicinal systems of many cultures, plants with long uses and benefits remain to be discovered. Moringa oleifera, unknown in the market just ten years ago, is surging into greater popularity due to its multiple health benefits and nutritious value as a food. Also known colloquially as “miracle tree,” moringa is a valuable plant medicine, and deserves a place in the home pharmacy.


‘Malunggay’ studied as water filter

By Annelle Tayao-Juego (Philippine Daily Inquirer)

The humble “malunggay” (Moringa oleifera) could make waves when it comes to the Philippines’ water purification industry, thanks to a research initiative headed by a Manila university in partnership with a Canada-based Filipino educator.

Malunggay’s potential as a water filter is being tapped by a joint research project of De La Salle University (DLSU) on Taft Avenue in Manila, University of Waterloo in Canada and George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

The researchers hope to come up with a cheap and easy-to-use water filtration system that could provide water even to remote rural communities in the Philippines.

The Barangay Water Project uses malunggay seeds packed with an adsorbent, such as sand, carbonized rice husk or activated carbon, to create a “point-of-use biofilter that can either be used at home or in small communities, like a school, for purifying drinking water,” Canada-based Sheree Pagsuyoin, the project’s lead investigator, said in an e-mail interview.

Pagsuyoin is also an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Waterloo.

Canadian grant

The project is funded by a grant from Grand Challenges Canada, a government program that aids research on global health issues in Canada and developing countries.

Pagsuyoin, who secured the grant, got in touch with Raymond Tan, DLSU vice chancellor for innovation and research, to form and head the Philippine team that would work on the project.

Pagsuyoin said the team chose to develop a water biofilter because “water treatment technologies are much needed in many low-income regions, especially in rural areas.”

“But we also recognize that these technologies should be environmentally, economically and socially sustainable for them to be effective over the long term,” she added.

Filtering properties

“We chose moringa because it is already widely known in the Philippines for its many other uses. Thus it will be easier to introduce the concept,” said Pagsuyoin, who has worked on other water and sanitation projects in rural areas in the Philippines and South Africa.

Previous studies on the use of malunggay seeds for water purification showed that these had proteins containing antimicrobial and coagulant properties that can kill coliform and remove turbidity in water, she said.

The seeds, however, also produce other organic elements that affect long-term storage of the treated water.

“Our goal with the biofilter is to harness the [seeds’] proteins’ antimicrobial properties while eliminating these organics,” Pagsuyoin said.

She said she had yet to complete lab experiments and the filter’s final design in Canada with the help of a DLSU graduate student, engineer John Barajas.

Luis F. Razon, director of the DLSU Food and Water Institute and a member of the research team, likened the expected final product design to that of a Brita filter, which is small and cylindrical.

Test set

The filter, Razon said, would be packed with malunggay seeds and adsorbents. One would just need to pour the contaminated water through the filter to remove the impurities.

Razon said the DLSU team would test the malunggay biofilter in July or August in Mulanay, a small seaside municipality in the Bondoc Peninsula in Quezon province, where the university previously worked in other projects.

In August 2014, Razon headed focus group discussions with 150 to 200 Mulanay residents to find out their main concerns about drinking water.

“What stood out to me was how they described the taste of the water they fetched from local wells—matabsing, which means an acrid and sort of salty taste. They were also aware that there were harmful bacteria in the water and that they could get sick from drinking it,” Razon said.

“So aside from creating a biofilter [that] can take out the impurities, we have to make sure that the water will also taste good,” he added.

Mulanay’s water supply comes from a mountain spring that Razon said tested positive for E. coli bacteria. So far, the team has been unable to determine why the water source is contaminated, Razon said.

If all goes well with the product testing in Mulanay, Razon said, the team hoped to bring the filter to more rural communities in the country that need potable water.

Commercial production

Razon said the researchers were also studying the biofilter’s marketability. Joost Santos, an assistant professor at George Washington University, is heading the feasibility study on the commercial production of the malunggay biofilter, Razon said.

“Personally, if the biofilter would be commercialized, I think it would be better for quality control. But, of course, we won’t limit it to that. Another option would be for someone to make his own biofilter and use it to treat water, which he could then sell,” Razon said.

“There are other possible uses, say, during a storm, when people are in need of clean water, they can use the biofilter,” he said.

Community attitude

The success of the Barangay Water Project, however, won’t just depend on the filter’s effectiveness, but on the community’s attitude toward using the filter, Razon said. For one, the community would need to have a steady supply of malunggay, which Mulanay has.

“[From past experiences], I’ve come to recognize that intervention technologies designed to improve the water and health status of low-income communities must be integrated into the locals’ daily activities,” Pagsuyoin said.

“Moringa has many other uses and livelihood can stem from encouraging its cultivation,” she added.

“It’s easy to work with Mulanay [residents] because they have become so used to consultative work. They’re good at organizing themselves. It is easy to instruct them to form groups, work in teams,” Razon said.

“It’s important that the community is organized, ready to receive the technology and willing to provide information. The local government has to be receptive,” he said.


Why We Should Learn More About Moringa

By Darryle Pollack

As a 20-year cancer survivor, I thought that I had heard of everything possible to promote good health. Then again, I also believe that the more you know, the more there is to learn. And moringa is proof of that.

Though I initially thought it might be a new Latin dance, I learned that moringa oleifera actually is a plant found in locales from the Caribbean to Asia to Africa, where it's been used in folk remedies for centuries. Almost unknown in the United States, its popularity is growing worldwide thanks to what many believe are its health benefits---ranging from boosting immunity, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, controlling blood pressure, blood sugar, increasing breast milk, even headache relief.

Moringa is so versatile that the entire plant can be used from root to seeds to tiny leaves; people fry, crush, boil, grind, blanch, even chew its various parts. Less creative or daring types who want its benefits can just take moringa as a supplement in its powder form.

I learned about Moringa thanks to Grace O., author of The Aging Gracefully Cookbook, featuring her collection of recipes to promote health, wellness and longevity. Moringa and 25 other intriguing ingredients form the foundation for her program called FoodTrients . As you might deduce, Foodtrients is a marriage of healthy nutrients and food, a philosophy inspired by the marriage of her parents. Grace's father was a medical doctor who believed foods could help his patients heal; her mother ran a cooking school in Southeast Asia where Grace was raised, and where people have been been eating indigenous plants known for health properties for thousands of years.

In addition to operating skilled nursing facilities in California, Grace O's mission is to share her knowledge and experience. Here's how she describes Foodtrients:

The nutrients in our food lead to our overall wellness...I start creating a recipe only after I find a fruit or grain or spice that has something beneficial to offer my body...To create my recipes, I scoured scientific studies, dug into long-established knowledge of medicinal herbs, sought out natural ingredients from cultures all over the world and drew on memories of my mother's culinary wisdom.

At her recent cookbook launch in Beverly Hills, featuring a Foodtrient buffet, moringa showed up as a dip paired with artichokes. I wasn't the only one at the event mystified by unfamiliar ingredients. Celebrity chef and Los Angeles restauranteur Eric Greenspan commented:

There were a lot of ingredients I didn't recognize.... Grace works them into everyday dishes, things like moringa, a plant with super nutritious leaves that she adds to vegetable soup. ..I was impressed by how well the flavors work together. What I love about Grace's book is that her recipes are very accessible and easy for the average home cook to execute. I'm already thinking about how to work moringa into my grilled cheese sandwiches!

In addition to chefs, scientists are also interested in learning more about moringa. It's the focus of current scientific studies seeking to prove its effectiveness as used in folk remedies. With a boost from Grace O's culinary creativity, moringa could soon become a household word. Remember you heard it here first.


  • Malunggay garnering recognition as 'superfood' rich in antioxidants

If you have a backyard garden with a meter or two of space to spare, best plant malunggay seeds. This is what Dr. Raffy Barrozo, organic agriculture expert and board member of the Moringaling Phlippines Foundation, Inc. (MPFI), advises. Malunggay, or moringa, is a well-known backyard plant in the Philippines and has been garnering international attention for being a "superfood" rich in nutrients and minerals. For every pound, malunggay has seven times more Vitamin C than oranges, three times more potassium that bananas, four times more Vitamin A than carrots, two times more protein and four times more calcium than milk, according to the MPFI. Malunggay is rich in antioxidants that can prevent several lifestyle-related ailments such as cardiovascular diseases, heart problems, high blood pressure, and cancer. »»» Read More